This Week's Program: Wednesday, January 12, 2011

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MAURA HARRINGTON shelltosea.com In Dec. 2010, the people of County Mayo awaited a decision about the multinational Shell continuing with the Corrib Gas Project. If permission is granted, the people of County Mayo, West Ireland will direct action against the project. A senior figure in Shell said that there could be dozens of gasfields similar to a major one off Ireland's west coast that has become the focus of a bitter battle with local people, according to a Wikilieaks cable from the US embassy in Dublin.
CHRISTINA CHAUVENET survivalinternational.org On January 17th, Botswana’s Court of Appeal will begin a hearing to decide whether Kalahari Bushmen living on their ancestral lands have the right to water.The Bushmen, who returned to their lands in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve after a previous court victory, are appealing against a 2010 High Court ruling that denied their right to access a well in the reserve they had used for decades. The 2010 ruling, which came a week before the UN formally recognized water as a fundamental human right, has been slammed by Africa’s key human rights body for denying the Bushmen’s ‘right to life’. Without the well, the Bushmen are forced to make arduous nearly 300 miles journeys by foot or donkey to fetch water from outside the reserve.
THOMAS POWERS thekillingofcrazyhorse.com Discusses the importance of original languages, the transmission of Native and American history, and
one question at the heart of ‘the killing of Crazy Horse’ and that is: why did Crazy Horse let the Army kill him? He was a warrior first and last but he walked to his own death and resisted only in the final moments when it became impossible to trust the Army further.
The most comprehensive narrative about Crazy Horse the Lakota warrior as a human being as told by the tiyospayes (extended families).
WAZIYATAWIN a professor and author of Indigenous history at the University of Victoria in British Columbia remarked at Winona State University in Nov. 2010 that the Dakota people might have to reclaim lost tribal lands "by any means necessary" has drawn the scrutiny of federal authorities. Waziyatawin said she received a call this week from the FBI to discuss the remarks "All of you are going to have to figure out your role. For Dakota people, I know we're going to need to recover our land base, by any means necessary."